Ed Sheeran - Stay With Me (Sam Smith Cover)

troyeller:

deliriosity:

Ed Sheeran | Stay With Me (Sam Smith Cover)

NEVER REBLOGGED SOMETHING SO FAST.

(via caffeinatedmuggle)

343,701 plays
laina:

laina:

laina:

this guy was watching the vmas with me and now he’s educating himself how precious is that

he keeps asking me all these questions about aspects of feminism and he’s like “so basically it’s about letting women do what they want without being judged for it” and I was like yea and he was like “oh okay that’s so simple why isn’t everyone a feminist” it’s precious

update: I banged him

laina:

laina:

laina:

this guy was watching the vmas with me and now he’s educating himself how precious is that

he keeps asking me all these questions about aspects of feminism and he’s like “so basically it’s about letting women do what they want without being judged for it” and I was like yea and he was like “oh okay that’s so simple why isn’t everyone a feminist” it’s precious

update: I banged him

(via caffeinatedmuggle)

I want to do a rom-com with Melissa McCarthy. I even told her that at an awards show, and she said ‘Yes, Let’s do it!’

Idris Elba, on his dream role, to US Weekly (via camewiththeframe)

omg i’m actually shaking with excitement just at the idea

(via curliestofcrowns)

(via aphoenixinwriting)

weareallohana:

Tom Hardy - Warrior

weareallohana:

Tom Hardy - Warrior

"Just call me Awesome. Awesome Hardy! That’s my name!"

Happy Birthday, Tom Hardy! (September 15, 1977)

"That’s my name!"

citylightscomebackinjune:

Tom Hardy is one of the greatest actors in the world today. The Drop was perfection. Tight script by Dennis Lehane and fantastic cinematography by Nicolas Karakatsanis. All the awards. Give it all the awards.

I couldn’t agree more.

An oldie but a goodie.

An oldie but a goodie.

charlidos:

An interview with Tom from the Chicago Sun Times:

Q: What was it about Bob Saginowski you enjoyed playing?A: I loved the ‘still waters run deep’ aspect of him. The unexpected things that he does. I loved the underestimated part of him — by the people around him. There’s a slow burn to him that was very intriguing to play.
Q: After playing a guy like that, does it make you look at people walking by on the street and wonder, ‘What’s he really like?’ or ‘What’s she really like?’A: Yes. We often immediately jump to conclusions about people, and that’s one of the wonderful things about this film. Bob reminds me of the hare and the tortoise story, in that it’s slowly, slowly you win the race. Never underestimate or judge a book by it’s cover, as they say. This film makes that extremely clear!
Q: What was the biggest challenge in playing him?A: He was so layered. So much going on with him under the surface. As an actor, it was a bit tricky to take on playing a guy who technically has committed a crime, so there’s a moral and ethical issue there with Bob. So to ethically justify the man’s actions is the trick. I really like Bob. Basically he’s a terrifically good guy. I enjoyed him, and I want people to enjoy him too.
Q: Of course loneliness is an important theme here, isn’t it?A: Oh yes, exactly. For much of the film you clearly get the sense of how lonely Bob is. In fact, all of the principal characters in the film are wounded and lonely in a sense. That goes for Noomi [Rapace’s] character of Nadia and Jimmmy Gandolfini’s Cousin Marv.Then, of course, there’s the puppy, the dog that Bob finds and adopts. He represents the injured puppy that’s really inside all of these characters, if you get my drift.
Q: Speaking of your cast here, of course, we have to ask how was to work with James Gandolfini — who clearly we lost far too soon. His performance here is superb.A: Yeah, it was incredibly special. It’s hard to talk about it in a sense. We’re obviously promoting a film here, but it almost pales to insignificance when you compare it to the loss of someone as lovely and talented and gifted as James. So, on the one hand it’s lovely to have such a lovely film, but at the same time the loss is there. He was so talented, wickedly funny and just makes me incredibly sad that he’s not here anymore.
Q: Brooklyn really is another character in this story, don’t you think?A: I do. New York, and Brooklyn in particular is full of so many different ethnicities and cultures — and many lonely people struggling to get by. Often, those people get lost in the overall scheme of things. What I like here, is that they are examined under the microscope of this film and you get some insight into what those lives are really like.Speaking of Brooklyn, I want to mention that the setting was so important to [director]Michael [Roskam] and [screenwriter] Dennis Lehane. They really wanted this to take us back to the kind of filmmaking done in the 1970s and infuse our film with that sensibility.
Q: The dog Rocco — the little injured pit bull that you find in the trash can — and adopt in the film. Did you bond with those puppies they used to portray Rocco? I know they had to use several dogs for filmmaking purposes.A: I love dogs. So that was great. I really, really love dogs. I have two of my own. Both I found in America. Two American dogs. For the film, the dog represents having a heart. They represent ultimate loyalty.
Q: I know you’ve spent time in Chicago. Your thoughts about our city?A: I love Chicago! I can’t wait to come back. I was at the Goodman [Theatre] there several years ago [in 2010] in ‘The Long Red Road’ directed by [Philip Seymour Hoffman]. Tragically, that’s another great actor and artist we’ve lost way too soon. I also worked there shooting ‘The Dark Knight’ [Hardy played the villian, Bane]. Chicago is great. Can’t wait to come back.
Q: On a much lighter note, you looked very natural playing a bartender. Did that come easily for you?A: I used to be a bartender! When I was a kid in London I worked in pubs. So I got the badge, as it were!


Tom Hardy was not in The Dark Knight. He was in The Dark Knight Rises. That was shot in Pittsburgh. He did not say that.

charlidos:

An interview with Tom from the Chicago Sun Times:

Q: What was it about Bob Saginowski you enjoyed playing?
A: I loved the ‘still waters run deep’ aspect of him. The unexpected things that he does. I loved the underestimated part of him — by the people around him. There’s a slow burn to him that was very intriguing to play.

Q: After playing a guy like that, does it make you look at people walking by on the street and wonder, ‘What’s he really like?’ or ‘What’s she really like?’
A: Yes. We often immediately jump to conclusions about people, and that’s one of the wonderful things about this film. Bob reminds me of the hare and the tortoise story, in that it’s slowly, slowly you win the race. Never underestimate or judge a book by it’s cover, as they say. This film makes that extremely clear!

Q: What was the biggest challenge in playing him?
A: He was so layered. So much going on with him under the surface. As an actor, it was a bit tricky to take on playing a guy who technically has committed a crime, so there’s a moral and ethical issue there with Bob. So to ethically justify the man’s actions is the trick. I really like Bob. Basically he’s a terrifically good guy. I enjoyed him, and I want people to enjoy him too.

Q: Of course loneliness is an important theme here, isn’t it?
A: Oh yes, exactly. For much of the film you clearly get the sense of how lonely Bob is. In fact, all of the principal characters in the film are wounded and lonely in a sense. That goes for Noomi [Rapace’s] character of Nadia and Jimmmy Gandolfini’s Cousin Marv.
Then, of course, there’s the puppy, the dog that Bob finds and adopts. He represents the injured puppy that’s really inside all of these characters, if you get my drift.

Q: Speaking of your cast here, of course, we have to ask how was to work with James Gandolfini — who clearly we lost far too soon. His performance here is superb.
A: Yeah, it was incredibly special. It’s hard to talk about it in a sense. We’re obviously promoting a film here, but it almost pales to insignificance when you compare it to the loss of someone as lovely and talented and gifted as James. So, on the one hand it’s lovely to have such a lovely film, but at the same time the loss is there. He was so talented, wickedly funny and just makes me incredibly sad that he’s not here anymore.

Q: Brooklyn really is another character in this story, don’t you think?
A: I do. New York, and Brooklyn in particular is full of so many different ethnicities and cultures — and many lonely people struggling to get by. Often, those people get lost in the overall scheme of things. What I like here, is that they are examined under the microscope of this film and you get some insight into what those lives are really like.
Speaking of Brooklyn, I want to mention that the setting was so important to [director]Michael [Roskam] and [screenwriter] Dennis Lehane. They really wanted this to take us back to the kind of filmmaking done in the 1970s and infuse our film with that sensibility.

Q: The dog Rocco — the little injured pit bull that you find in the trash can — and adopt in the film. Did you bond with those puppies they used to portray Rocco? I know they had to use several dogs for filmmaking purposes.
A: I love dogs. So that was great. I really, really love dogs. I have two of my own. Both I found in America. Two American dogs. For the film, the dog represents having a heart. They represent ultimate loyalty.

Q: I know you’ve spent time in Chicago. Your thoughts about our city?
A: I love Chicago! I can’t wait to come back. I was at the Goodman [Theatre] there several years ago [in 2010] in ‘The Long Red Road’ directed by [Philip Seymour Hoffman]. Tragically, that’s another great actor and artist we’ve lost way too soon. I also worked there shooting ‘The Dark Knight’ [Hardy played the villian, Bane]. Chicago is great. Can’t wait to come back.

Q: On a much lighter note, you looked very natural playing a bartender. Did that come easily for you?
A: I used to be a bartender! When I was a kid in London I worked in pubs. So I got the badge, as it were!

Tom Hardy was not in The Dark Knight. He was in The Dark Knight Rises. That was shot in Pittsburgh. He did not say that.

abbyology87:

Tom and Louis Hardy rap

For those of you who are new to the Tom Hardy fandom, this is a must see.

I mean, we should be allowed to have proper tracksuit pants—that’s only fair, right? My favorite pants, the pants I wore to university—I see myself tending to my vegetables at the tender age of sixty-five wearing the same fucking pants! Because they’re awesome. Those pants—pants with integrity. With a stripe down the side. Any color you fucking like. But not the pants I’ve been seeing.

Tom Hardy, Esquire

"Pants with integrity" might be my new favorite fashion phrase.

(Side note: working out of the home means track pants all the time.)

(via growingpangs)

thas-fandom:

TIFF | The Drop World Premiere

Source GabboT



thas-fandom:

TIFF | The Drop | Press Conference

source alesiax





Toronto, Ontario. September 6, 2014

I'm a tall blonde with a smart mouth. What else do you need to know?

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